The first look at how WeWork’s R&D group measures architectural success.

My latest article for ARCHITECT magazine looks at what Autodesk presented (and didn’t present) at Autodesk University this year.

Delving into the core of NURBs, I explain how manipulate the input values to NURBs so you can draw mathematical shapes like hyperboloids.

I explore the differences between creating a parametric model with a logic programming paradigm compared to creating a model with a more conventional dataflow paradigm. The logic programming paradigm enables the reversal of the parametric process by turning static geometry into a parametric model. However, outside this niche application, logic programming proves to be a difficult modelling interface.

I consider how the principles of structured programming apply to the organisation of parametric models. Splitting models into hierarchies of modules appears to increase the legibility of the models and improve model reuse. Perhaps more importantly, the structure seemed to allow ordinarily pivotal decisions to be made much later in the design process – in some cases, moments prior to construction.

Drawing upon innovations in software engineering Integrated Development Environments (IDEs) to create an interactive programming interface for architects. The interface enables designers to modify their code and immediately see the geometry of the model change. This case study positions the scripting environment itself as a important site of innovation, a site where many programmers have already provided numerous useful innovations.

David Fano and Federico Negro of CASE Inc. discuss the organisational challenges of computational design.

Parametric modelling is hard

13 December 2011

Six quotes that begin to expose some of the rarely discussed problems with parametric modelling.

MacLeamy’s curve implies that designers are most effective when they shift their effort forwards on a project. In this post I draw upon software engineering to suggest how MacLeamy’s curve can be manipulated to prevent this shift in effort.

Evolute’s recent patenting of freeform planar surfaces and what it means for architecture. Evolute respond, as do many others, in a long debate in the comments section.

In the past week there have been three new software projects launched. Draftsite – Dassault’s free clone of AutoCAD. AutoCAD WS – AutoCAD for the iPhone. Evolute – software to optimise surfaces in Rhino.